Modern Day Homes

Click below to watch our Introduction to the Monolithic Dome Homes video.

Choosing a Site for Your Dome Home

Monolithic Dome overlooking a Pond — The easiest place to build a Monolithic Dome is on a nice flat piece of land with good drainage. But a Monolithic Dome is so versatile, it can be constructed on a limitless number of sites.

Choosing a proper site for a Monolithic Dome is both simple and complex. Obviously, the easiest place to build is on a nice flat piece of land with good drainage, but a Monolithic Dome is so versatile it can be constructed on a limitless number of sites. You can put it on a mountainside, a valley or even over water. No matter where you build, be sure to take advantage of your property and sight lines.

The True Cost of a Dome Home

The initial cost of a Monolithic Dome is usually the same as a custom-built, conventional home of equal interior finish. If you planned on buying a $100,000 house, you will probably have to pay $100,000 for your dome home. However, the long-term, day-to-day costs of a Monolithic Dome will always be lower. And the true cost of owning a dome home is substantially less.

Underground Homes – Good or Bad?

Excavation — Crews excavated for the placement of five interconnected Monolithic Domes for this underground home in Buffalo, Texas.

Has the idea of living in an underground home tempted you? If so, you’re part of a growing minority. More and more people, worldwide, have already or plan to build an earth-sheltered or earth-bermed home.

A Curved Slice of Heaven

Merrell Residence — Ray and Beth Merrell’s dome sits on a bluff in the Hatchet Ranch development south of Pueblo.

The headline of the Pueblo Chieftain article on a Monolithic Dome home in Colorado says it all. For the Merrell’s, living in a dome home is like a little piece of heaven.

Damage Prevention — Advice from an Expert

Dennis A. Quan currently works as Benefit Cost Analyst/Engineer with James Lee Witt Associates, the emergency preparedness and management experts of GlobalOptions Group. His past positions include Emergency Manager with the State of Florida, Division of Emergency Management and Hazard Mitigation Engineer/officer with FEMA. That experience has prompted Mr. Quan to complete a thought-provoking report about the strength and endurance of structures during natural disasters.