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Monolithic Dome Churches

Image: Faith Chapel — Faith Chapel Christian Center, a mega-church complex of six Monolithic Domes. Its sanctuary has a diameter of 280 feet, a height of 72 feet, and an interior of 61,575 square feet with seating for 3000, classrooms and offices.

Faith Chapel — Faith Chapel Christian Center, a mega-church complex of six Monolithic Domes. Its sanctuary has a diameter of 280 feet, a height of 72 feet, and an interior of 61,575 square feet with seating for 3000, classrooms and offices. (Monolithic)


Image: Legacy Church — This 192’ dome, Legacy Church, was built in 2004. It is a 3000 seat church in New Mexico.
Image: Indonesian Mosque — This small Mosque was built in Indonesia by Dome for the World. Its an Ecoshell II that was built in the small village called New Ngelepen.

A Monolithic Dome church can be as small as a chapel or as large as a megachurch. It can consist of one or several domes, that can be built at one time or in economically manageable phases.

What does your congregation need and want? We can help you reach your goal — possibly surpass it!

With a Monolithic Dome, you have several advantages. The initial construction cost and construction time of a Monolithic Dome is generally less than that for a same-size, similarly equipped conventional structure.

The same is true for ongoing expenses, such as maintenance and insurance and particularly energy.

The construction materials and foam insulation of a Monolithic Dome create a structure that becomes a thermal battery. So, with a minimum of energy and regardless of the outdoor temperature, your church can maintain an interior that is comfortable and serene.

To read More About the Monolithic Dome Churches, click here!

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How To Buy a Monolithic Dome Church

Buying a Monolithic Dome church is a serious decision that usually involves church leaders, administrators and the congregation. So, it’s vitally important that everyone involved understands the benefits of Monolithic construction and the procedures to follow to get more information and finalize plans. (Continued…)

Monolithic Churches: New Developments

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Planning, particularly when it involves more than one person, is not always easy. Yet detailed planning is the key to building the worship facility your congregation needs and wants. Follow this link to ideas and information on just what to include in your planning and what’s new in church construction. (Continued…)

Commercial Feasibility Study

Image: Aggieland Dome — The 124′×40′ dome encompasses 12,000 square feet on the ground level and 2,400 square feet on the mezzanine level. The fitness area offers an oversized free weight area, quick circuit area, cardio machines with individual TVs on all 31 pieces, locker rooms with individual shower and dressing areas, and a sauna in the men and women’s locker rooms.  Building was completed in January 2004.

A Feasibility Study is a preliminary study for a project that compares the Monolithic Dome Process to other building systems. This preliminary analysis defines the design and intent of the project and provides an estimated budget and schedule, based on the best available information. Monolithic produces a Feasibility Study to assist a client before full design, management and/or construction services are engaged. (Continued…)

Featured Monolithic Dome Churches

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Many churches are not the simple structures they used to be. Modern ones often include sophisticated audio/video equipment, nationwide radio and TV broadcasting, stages for drama productions, theme buildings, etc. Follow this link to stories about Monolithic Dome churches with such features. (Continued…)

Commercial Plan and Design

If you’re concerned about anything related to the planning and design of a Monolithic Dome school church, gym, etc. you will probably find the answer you need in this section. Besides articles by experts and Monolithic Dome owners and/or administrators, it contains tools, such as Googles’s “SketchUp,” for planning a dome and photographs. And new information is frequently added. (Continued…)