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Extending a Helping Hand: Nonprofit Activities

In 2005 David South and Andrew South, launched Domes For The World. DFTW, as a nonprofit organization, strives to improve the lives of impoverished people worldwide through the introduction and construction of Monolithic Domes and EcoShells, thus providing permanent, fireproof, disaster-resistant homes and community buildings.

Other nonprofit organizations with similar missions also include Solid House Foundation, Change the World Ministries, One Dome At A Time, World Youth International, Shelters International Disaster Response and the Southern Sudan Education Project.

This section features articles about these growing efforts.

Building in Haiti: One man’s solution

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Dan Hildebrand is a man trained in building Monolithic Domes, who has helped on several projects in places like Haiti. He has a real passion for that type of work and for helping people. What he describes in the article that follows is help for a small number of Haitians. But before you read Dan’s article, let me tell you about two magnanimous plans that never saw reality. (Continued…)

On the Road to Nairobi

Image: Workers and volunteers apply concrete on an EcoShell.

Monolithic Domes and EcoShells are making a difference in the lives of orphans in Nyamasaria, Kenya. The Owiti Children’s Home and Medical Center, operated by World Youth International, opened its doors in 2004 and became home to more than 50 children. (Continued…)

Impact Assessment of New Ngelepen

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When the May 2006 earthquake destroyed much of Indonesia, Domes For The World responded with rebuilding plans. By April 2007, DFTW successfully designed and built the village of New Ngelepen, including 71 EcoShell homes and various other community buildings. In April 2011, a team of DFTW experts traveled back to New Ngelepen to assess the impact of this project on the village and its economy. Click here to read the report. (Continued…)

DFTW is Part of a Living Village

Image: The Living Village at Engineering and Humanity Week 2011 — During Engineering & Humanity Week 2011, The Living Village will be home to students who will live, cook their meals and sleep in temporary shelters designed to house people displaced by war and natural disasters. Students, faculty and local members of the community will build the village on the SMU campus lawn, showing casing a variety of shelter technologies.

Stephanie and Hunter Hunt are Dallas philanthropists who are working to make the world a better place by improving living standards for the world’s poorest people. That’s why they founded the Hunt Institute for Engineering & Humanity at Southern Methodist University. This week, the institute is raising awareness about global poverty by hosting a living village designed to inspire action. (Continued…)

How to Restructure, Improve, Enhance a Country: Build Better!

When you first begin really looking into current living conditions worldwide, what you hear and read appears overwhelmingly staggering – a situation impossible to correct or even improve. We do not believe that. For one, it’s too easy – too easy to just look at the bigness and give up. Secondly, we do believe we have solutions: 21st Century technology. We know it’s practical and we believe it’s doable. (Continued…)

Help Us Be A Changemaker

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David B. South has spent most of his life trying to change the world. Since building his first Monolithic Dome in 1975, he has been working to convince people to think outside the box. Now he has a chance to be formally recognized as a Changemaker as part of an international competition for sustainable urban housing. (Continued…)

Domes For The World: Rebuilding Haiti’s Orphanage Project Hope

Haiti’s devastating earthquake of January 12, 2010 claimed millions of victims. Some of the most destitute were parentless children living at an orphanage called Pwoje Espwa (Creole for Project Hope) in the Southern Region. Project Hope, which had been operating since 1998 by providing shelter, food, education and vocational training, was completely destroyed. (Continued…)

Domes For The World Foundation Asks You to Help

Image: Indonesian village of New Ngelepen — This village of 80 Domes brought new homes, clean water, a school, a masjiid and a medical clinic to 71 families.

The Domes For The World Foundation’s mission is to improve the lives of people worldwide through the introduction and construction of Monolithic Domes and EcoShells for personal and public use. We will initiate and coordinate efforts to alleviate shortages of housing and community facilities in struggling cultures and impoverished lands. (Continued…)

At Home in the Dome

David Smith first learned about Monolithic Dome construction 13 years ago, and has been a fan every since. In fact, he has been so impressed with the buildings that he started a dome-building business called Smith Family Dome Home Builders. (Continued…)

EcoShells Changing Lives in Mexico

Since earthquakes struck Haiti and Chile earlier this year, interest in EcoShells has been at an an all-time high. Relief agencies from all over the world have been calling Monolithic to find out more about this unique type of building that has been proven to withstand earthquakes and hurricanes and yet can be built entirely by hand using local labor. (Continued…)

Monolithic Ecoshells in Developing Nations

Check out this video describing the Monolithic Ecoshell and why it is the choice for housing in developing nations. They are strong structures that can withstand natural disasters, fire, termites and rot. In underdeveloped areas with hot climates, EcoShells make affordable, low maintenance, sturdy housing. (Continued…)

Clean Water for Haiti

Image: Water purification unit

Since the devastating quake of January 12, the Dallas chapter of the Texas Baptist Men has delivered more than 13,000 units of their water-filter system to Haiti. Unfortunately that has not eradicated the problem. A lack of potable water is still severely contributing to illness and death – especially among children. (Continued…)

Dome Homes Planned for Peru

An Idaho real estate investor will help the world go round when she breaks ground next February on 139 Monolithic Dome homes in Chiclayo, Peru. The project will be a first for Sube International LLC, which Lynda Eggimann founded earlier this year to build dome homes in the developing world. (Continued…)

Domes For The World Featured in Concrete International

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When an earthquake struck Indonesia’s Island of Java in May 2006, some communities were harder hit than others. Ngelepen, for example, was devastated by a major landslide that wiped away every structure in town. But thanks to generous assistance from the World Association of Non-Governmental Organizations (WANGO) and Dubai-based Emaar Properties, the Domes For The World (DFTW) Foundation was able to rebuild the community by constructing safe and efficient Monolithic EcoShells. (Continued…)

May 2007-DFTW Completes First Major Project: 71 Homes in Indonesia

Domes For The World (DFTW), a Salt Lake-City-based nonprofit foundation established in 2005 with a mission to improve the lives of people worldwide through the introduction and construction of Monolithic Domes and EcoShells, has completed its first major project: a village of 71 dome homes, six public lavatories, a mosque, a medical clinic and a kindergarten on the Island of Java in Indonesia. (Continued…)

A New Way of Life

This is a video featuring the project by Domes for the World in New Ngelepen, Indonesia. The New Ngelepen project included 77 houses, 6 MCK’s (bathroom, shower facilities), 6 wells, 6 septic systems, a church, and roads. (Continued…)