Faith Chapel Christian Center — Located in Birmingham, Alabama, this Monolithic Dome mega church was built in 2000. It is a 280ft diameter dome with 61,575sf (1.414 acre).

Faith Chapel Christian Center

Birmingham, Alabama is home to the largest diameter Monolithic Dome church in the world. Built in 2000, Faith Chapel Christian Center measures 280-feet in diameter with a seating capacity of approximately 3,000. The dome encloses 61,575 square feet. The church was designed by Architect Rick Crandall and Dome Technology of Idaho Falls, Idaho built the dome shell.


A fireplace in the Monolithic Dome

Chuck Peters made his fireplace the centerpiece of his living room.

I’m often asked if there’s a trick to installing fireplaces in a Monolithic Dome. It’s actually pretty straightforward. The real question is, “Do you need the fireplace?” I see the romantic appeal of visiting around a glowing fire or the desire to reduce your heating bill. However, the energy efficiency of the dome typically changes a need for a fireplace into a want.

Dome homeowner wants to watch next hurricane — not evacuate

David Smith in front of his Monolithic Dome home near Orange, Texas.

For many, the mass evacuation for hurricane Rita was a bigger disaster than the storm. Millions left their homes and inched their way north in a Texas sized traffic jam. Many ran out of fuel while parked on the freeway. Others stayed behind only to face the peril of the storm itself. As Eric Besson of the Beaumont Enterprise reports, “Rita showed that, in the worst cases, no matter the decision, few avoid suffering.”

Landmark concrete dome home for sale — for a lot

It’s called the Flintstone house. Built in 1976 near San Francisco this all-concrete home was reportedly inspired by the first Monolithic Dome built in 1975. Whether it was or not, the house is a well known landmark in the community as well as a landmark design for inflatable concrete construction. And it’s for sale for the modest California price of $4.2 million.

Domed safe rooms disguised as gymnasium, cafeteria, and community center

Rendering of nearly complete safe-room / gymnasium for St. Joseph High School in Victoria, Texas.

The architect addressed an audience of school administrators. He proclaimed that no one can affordably build large safe rooms. The best a school could do are small rooms for refuge in an emergency. He was followed by David South who said, yes, you can build a large safe room — disguised as a gym.

Monolithic Open House 2015

It’s time again for the Monolithic Dome Institute Open House. On October 17, 2015 we open two houses, the offices, our manufacturing plant, and other domes on our property for tours. From 10 AM to 4 PM on our campus in Italy, Texas. Everyone is welcome to come.

News spreads about dome surviving wildfire

Seven ways to reduce risk of home becoming fuel for a wildfire.

John Belles was interviewed on NPR Morning Edition about his Monolithic Dome that survived the largest wildfire in Washington state history. It’s another in a prolific stream of news articles about the dome. We liked what John told the reporter, “You could build a square house that was nonflammable. There’s lots of advanced materials and whatnot. They still build out of stick, though.”

Monolithic Dome high school fine arts center opens next week

Santa Fe Trails High School main theater under construction.

The Santa Fe Trail High School in Carbondale, Kansas opens their new Monolithic Dome fine arts center in a week. The facility houses a 500 seat theater, band room and choir room. The Osage County Herald-Chronicle reports that the second dome, a gymnasium, is expected to open September 21.

Monolithic Dome saves man from fire

John Belles home after the wildfire.

If you missed our Facebook post or the news reports, a Monolithic Dome protected a man during a wildfire in Washington. John Belles rode out the fire inside his Monolithic Dome home that he built in 1999. The news report has spread worldwide.

Better arctic living in a Monolithic Dome

Monolithic Dome Photosphere design.

Time lapse construction video of a Monolithic Dome. Susane Havelka is a PhD candidate at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. They hope to demonstrate the advantages of the Monolithic Dome for people living in the arctic. They call their project the Protosphere.