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Residential Plan and Design

Want to read the suggestions and ideas of architects and designers who have successfully planned many Monolithic Dome homes? Want to see their designs? Or, are you more interested in what engineers have to say about Monolithic Dome homes? Do you have questions about the heating or air conditioning of a Monolithic Dome home? If you’re concerned about anything related to the planning and design of a Monolithic Dome home, you will probably find the answer you need in this section. Besides articles by experts and Monolithic Dome owners and/or administrators, it contains tools, such as Google’s “SketchUp,” for planning a dome, floor plans and photographs. And new information is frequently added.

To read information about Commercial Plan & Design, click here. (Continued…)

Blogs: Design

Monolithic welcomes and encourages the ideas of architects and designers. We have found those design ideas, for both privately and publicly owned Monolithic Domes, as varied as the professionals who authored them. This blog presents such innovative thinking, as well as design-related articles of general interest. (Continued…)

Commercial Plan and Design

If you’re concerned about anything related to the planning and design of a Monolithic Dome school church, gym, etc. you will probably find the answer you need in this section. Besides articles by experts and Monolithic Dome owners and/or administrators, it contains tools, such as Googles’s “SketchUp,” for planning a dome and photographs. And new information is frequently added. (Continued…)

To Architects and Designers: Tax Rebate 179-D

Many people do not know that there are some serious tax implications for designers of public-funded structures. Such buildings include schools, city halls – anything paid for with public monies. I urge architects and designers to review Section 179-D of the tax code. You as a designer can get a tax rebate of up to a $1.80 per square foot when you design these publicly financed buildings. (Continued…)

Michael McCoy Architects, Inc.

Image: Michael McCoy of Michael McCoy Architects hopes to design more Monolithic Dome projects in the future.

After more than twenty years of experience and with the completion of 100+ projects under his professional belt, Oklahoma-based Architect Michael McCoy encountered the Monolithic Dome. Was he surprised? Yes and No. Was he pleased? Yes. (Continued…)

An Architect’s Sketch Book: Domes For Tomorrow II

Image: Sample Pages — front cover

Architect Rick Crandall’s Domes For Tomorrow II is an idea book of innovative, unique Monolithic Dome designs. It includes color photographs and/or drawings of Monolithic facilities designed as schools, churches, homes, gymnasiums, a theater, a shopping center, a nightclub, a planetarium, a yacht club, an apartment complex, a hotel, a theme park, a golf course, a library, a hospital, offices, a bakery, a detention facility, and aircraft hangars.  (Continued…)

Douglas Stanton Architects: Integrating Landscape Design and Monolithic Domes

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In 1983, in a History of Modern Architecture class at Harvard University graduate school, Architect Doug Stanton first heard about Wallace Neff’s air-formed, bubble domes. Since then Doug has been designing Monolithic Domes as homes, disaster-shelter additions and cabanas – each complemented with beautiful, practical landscaping. (Continued…)

Design Advantages of the Monolithic Dome

Image: Monolithic Dome Rental in Italy, Texas — This Rental Unit provides secure, quiet, clean and affordable living accommodations even when an approaching storm darkens the skies.

There is no such thing as a free lunch, but the Monolithic Dome comes close. The original cost of a Monolithic Dome is generally less than that of a similar- size conventional building. Often it is much less. Then there is cost recovery. Generally, over a period of twenty years, savings in energy costs will equal the full cost of a Monolithic Dome facility. So, in effect, it becomes free. (Continued…)

Chris Zweifel: Consulting Engineer

Image: Chris Zweifel

Chris Zweifel, now 41 and successfully operating ZZ Consulting, said that he always wanted to be an engineer. The question was what kind since engineering encompasses many branches. “I couldn’t make up my mind – had a hard time figuring it out,” Chris admits. Finally, about the time he began working on his bachelor’s degree, he decided on Civil Engineering. (Continued…)

Robert Bissett’s New Design Book

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Authored by architectural designer and artist Robert Bissett, this book takes the reader through all the stages required to produce a functional and attractive set of working drawings. The prospective home owner will learn how to start with a pencil-drawn floor plan, build a 3D computer model and produce and publish a complete set of house plans. (Continued…)

A Mural for a Monolithic Dome

Image: The 100’ wide by 30’ high expanses on either side of the gym floor provided both an opportunity and a challenge for the artist.

During the past 30 years, Pat Rawlings of Dripping Springs, Texas (www.patrawlings.com) has done much of his artwork for NASA and aerospace clients around the world. But one of his more recent murals was done for Woodsboro ISD’s new, 20,000-square-foot, Monolithic Dome gym/auditorium/activity center that doubles as the community disaster shelter. (Continued…)

Laying out a Prolate Ellipse

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Often we are asked how to lay out the foundation for a prolate ellipse. Some people want to have their Monolithic Dome home shaped as a prolate ellipse. One reason people might want this design is because they have a narrow lot and need to squeeze the dome in the middle to make it fit. Sometimes they want the length of the dome to be longer so they get more of a look of what is on the outside of the building. (Continued…)

Berming a Monolithic Dome

Image: This bermed Monolithic Dome home belonging to Al Schwartz is covered with a spectacular combination of natural stone from the area and local vegetation.

Have you ever thought about berming your Monolithic Dome? If you have, you’re in luck! It’s very simple to do because of the Monolithic Dome’s inherent strength. Learn how to avoid water problems by addressing the footing. Read about the preferred method for backfilling and more. (Continued…)