Monolithic Dome Schools – THE answer for schools in “tornado alley.”
See: http://www.monolithic.com/topics/schools

Monolithic Dome Schools – THE answer for schools in “tornado alley.”

See: http://www.monolithic.com/topics/schools


Letter to all School Superintendents and Legislators

School children were killed in the tornado that hit Moore, Oklahoma in the spring of 2013. That need not happen at your school – or any school. It is possible to have A TORNADO-SAFE and AFFORDABLE SCHOOL.

See: Sample Monolithic Dome School Pricing

You need a structure that can provide what FEMA calls “near-absolute protection.” It’s the ability to survive even a F5 tornado. A Monolithic Dome, constructed of steel-reinforced concrete, has that ability, and that may make it eligible for a FEMA grant to cover up to 75% of a Monolithic Dome’s construction cost.

The disaster-resistant Monolithic Dome is also bullet-proof, with easily protected and monitored entrances. It’s fire-resistant and termite-proof.

And it is affordable. The initial cost of a Monolithic Dome compares favorably with that of a traditional, unsafe structure of the same size. While that’s good news, the news about a dome’s ongoing costs – energy, insurance, maintenance – is even better.

Monolithic Domes are insulated with sprayed-in polyurethane foam that fills a building’s every nook and cranny, making it super energy-efficient. On average, power bills are at least 50% less than those for other types of buildings of a similar size and use.

Your tornado-safe dome can be designed for any need. It can have state-of-the-art classrooms or be a gym, an auditorium, a cafeteria, a multipurpose center, etc. Your campus can include one dome of just about any size or several domes. It can be certified as a community disaster shelter.

We can work with you on a design/build basis or collaborate with your architect. We know how to do that and have already done it for many schools – including several in your state.

School should be a place where children feel and are safe – even from a tornado. Let us help you make your school such a place. Please contact us via email president@monolithic.com or phone 972-483-7423. We will answer your questions and provide you with all the information you need. And please visit our website: www.monolithic.com – it has detailed information and photos of Monolithic Dome schools.


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Image: Locust Grove is in tornado alley. The community chose Monolithic Domes because of the domes’ ability to withstand a tornado.
See: http://www.monolithic.com/stories/feature-school-locust-grove-oklahoma

Locust Grove is in tornado alley. The community chose Monolithic Domes because of the domes’ ability to withstand a tornado.

See: http://www.monolithic.com/stories/feature-school-locust-grove-oklahoma

Image: Dale, Oklahoma School: In case of a tornado, this dome can shelter all of Dale’s students and staff plus a spillover of 400 to 500 community members.
See: http://www.monolithic.com/stories/monolithic-dome-cafeteria-at-dale-oklahoma

Dale, Oklahoma School: In case of a tornado, this dome can shelter all of Dale’s students and staff plus a spillover of 400 to 500 community members.

See: http://www.monolithic.com/stories/monolithic-dome-cafeteria-at-dale-oklahoma

Image: Geronimo, Oklahoma — A whopping 73% of Geronimo’s voters passed a $5.7 million bond, $4 million of which was slated for the construction of five Monolithic Domes.
See: http://www.monolithic.com/stories/geronimo-bond-passed

Geronimo, Oklahoma — A whopping 73% of Geronimo’s voters passed a $5.7 million bond, $4 million of which was slated for the construction of five Monolithic Domes.

See: http://www.monolithic.com/stories/geronimo-bond-passed

Image: Locust Grove, Oklahoma is a small community with just 1,200 residents. But in 2007, they passed a bond to add Monolithic Domes to their campus.
See: http://www.monolithic.com/stories/feature-school-locust-grove-oklahoma

Locust Grove, Oklahoma is a small community with just 1,200 residents. But in 2007, they passed a bond to add Monolithic Domes to their campus.

See: http://www.monolithic.com/stories/feature-school-locust-grove-oklahoma

Image: The Muscogee (Creek) Nation recently had a grand opening for its new $4 million Monolithic Dome multipurpose facility in Okmulgee, Oklahoma.
The 20,000-square-foot facility, which is adjacent to the existing sports complex, includes spectator seating, classrooms, concessions and several multi-use areas. It will be used for the many events the Muscogee (Creek) Nation hosts each year to share and preserve the tribe’s tribal identity.
See: http://www.monolithic.com/topics/muscogee-nation

The Muscogee (Creek) Nation recently had a grand opening for its new $4 million Monolithic Dome multipurpose facility in Okmulgee, Oklahoma.

The 20,000-square-foot facility, which is adjacent to the existing sports complex, includes spectator seating, classrooms, concessions and several multi-use areas. It will be used for the many events the Muscogee (Creek) Nation hosts each year to share and preserve the tribe’s tribal identity.

See: http://www.monolithic.com/topics/muscogee-nation

Image: In 2011, construction began on Locust Grove’s new elementary school – a complex of five, interconnected Monolithic Domes designed by Architect Lee Gray of Salt Lake City, Utah.
See: http://www.monolithic.com/stories/feature-school-locust-grove-oklahoma

In 2011, construction began on Locust Grove’s new elementary school – a complex of five, interconnected Monolithic Domes designed by Architect Lee Gray of Salt Lake City, Utah.

See: http://www.monolithic.com/stories/feature-school-locust-grove-oklahoma

Image: Beggs, Oklahoma Event Center — Beggs built two Monolithic Domes: A 160’ diameter gymnasium/event center built on a 24’ Orion wall; a 112’ diameter dome on a 12’ Orion wall that provides nine additional classrooms, offices and a student commons area.
See: http://www.monolithic.com/stories/beggshighschool

Beggs, Oklahoma Event Center — Beggs built two Monolithic Domes: A 160’ diameter gymnasium/event center built on a 24’ Orion wall; a 112’ diameter dome on a 12’ Orion wall that provides nine additional classrooms, offices and a student commons area.

See: http://www.monolithic.com/stories/beggshighschool

Image: Texhoma School District — It serves approximately 500 students, in prekindergarten through grade 12, and now has a new Monolithic Dome facility for students in grades 5 through 12.
See: http://www.monolithic.com/stories/texhomas-showplace-a-new-monolithic-dome-school

Texhoma School District — It serves approximately 500 students, in prekindergarten through grade 12, and now has a new Monolithic Dome facility for students in grades 5 through 12.

See: http://www.monolithic.com/stories/texhomas-showplace-a-new-monolithic-dome-school