Search results

Fire Stations

Articles pertaining to designs created for fire station and emergency center Monolithic Domes.

Foam: Fire Hazard and Fire Barrier

Fire damage from three wood structures and 300 gallons of transformer oil – Cargill – Channelview, TX
  A violent, wind-driven fire fueled by three wood structures and 300 gallons of transformer oil burned about a third of the covering off this fertilizer storage. The fire was the worst possible. Late at night, wind blew the fire directly toward the building. The fire department was not immediately called, so the oil burned completely. Damage was most severe to the exterior. In a 12-square-foot area, urethane was totally burned off, but the rest suffered more minor damage. The foam could be cleaned and a coating or metal cladding could be installed over it. No damage was detected on the inside of the Monolithic Dome.
  Note that the foam held the fire back for a considerable time, and then the nonflammable concrete ended any possibility of the flames burning through to the stored product. Materials inside the dome were totally unaffected by the fire, and the dome’s concrete interior never even got warm.

When sprayed on the interior of a building, with no covering such as shotcrete or drywall, polyurethane foam can create a dangerous fire hazard. Monolithic Domes are as close to fireproof as you can make a building with today’s technology. Yet they have urethane as a major component. Currently, urethane foam is the world’s best insulation, but let me tell you the rest of the story.

A Monolithic Dome Fire Station

Large firehouse — This firehouse can hold various emergency vehicles as well as provide sleeping quarters.

At Monolithic, we think fire stations should be indestructible. They house emergency response teams – the firefighters and paramedics a community needs when natural or man-made disasters strike.

Fire in Monolithic Dome Extinguishes Itself!

Fire! — Apparently, a coffeepot started a fire in this Monolithic Dome rental unit.

A Thursday evening in September was quiet until the Fire Department and Sheriff’s Department were called to a fire in one of our rental domes. But the interesting part of this story is that the fire, inside the dome, extinguished itself!

Fire safety comes standard, no sprinklers required

Cosmetic fire damaged Monolithic Dome

Years ago, a late night fire started next to a 10,000-ton urea storage in Channelview, Texas. It consumed three wood structures built against the Monolithic Dome. Over 300 gallons of transformer oil fueled the blaze. For an hour, strong winds blew the inferno directly over the dome.

Fire Safety in a Monolithic Dome or Any Home 

In Charca Casa, my home in Italy, Texas, I have installed a mini fire-hydrant inside an easily available, affordable kitchen cabinet.

Many years ago I decided I wanted a fire-suppression system in my home. I was not interested in fire extinguishers that may or may not work and seem always in the way. I wanted an actual, simple, but extremely effective water system. 

How to load Monolithic eBooks on a Kindle Fire

Installing a Monolithic ebook on your Kindle Fire is easy.

Installing a Monolithic ebook on your Kindle Fire is easy. I have listed the steps in this article, but the best way to read these steps is by clicking on the fist image, then using the captions to give the step-by-step instructions.

Fire destroys contents but Monolithic Dome only needs washing

On March 25 a fire erupted at “Kinsey Quilts,” the quilting business operated by Donna and David Kinsey in a 20-foot Monolithic Dome in Weatherford, Texas.

In 1999, David and Donna Kinsey purchased a Monoquad for equipment storage on their acre in Weatherford, Texas. They then completed two 20-foot domes: a laundry facility and an office. They also began planning four interconnected 20-foot domes and a 28-foot Orion. In 2011, Donna launched her new quilting business “Kinsey Quilts” in a 20-foot Monolithic Dome. Fire broke out in that dome on March 25, 2013.

Fire: An unfortunate but convincing experience

Another “square home” destroyed by fire.

“You can bet the (next) house will be a dome. I only get burned once…. Pun intended.” So said Frank Figueroa, who works with Monolithic Constructors, Inc., and whose small, brick home in Italy, Texas burned on the afternoon of January 15.

Monolithic Dome saves man from fire

John Belles home after the wildfire.

If you missed our Facebook post or the news reports, a Monolithic Dome protected a man during a wildfire in Washington. John Belles rode out the fire inside his Monolithic Dome home that he built in 1999. The news report has spread worldwide.

Are Monolithic Domes’ exterior coverings fireproof?

The Monolithic Dome is as fire safe as you can build. The outside cover fabric can be damaged by fire. It can be covered using coatings, but if we are building in a high fire area, we recommend that the exterior of the dome get a 2” coat of concrete as well. Where we have done that, fire has passed right over the dome with virtually no damage.

Monolithic Emergency Center

Emergency Center Prototype A (birds eye view) — This alternative for the Emergency Center has the three domes in a row. It will fit on narrower property. The size of the domes will be determined by what needs to go in the building.

A Monolithic Emergency Center is an all-encompassing complex that includes specific areas for fire engines, rescue vehicles and ambulances; 911 and police communication centers; a disaster shelter. It is much, much more than a fire station.

Podcast: Strengthening Churches

Monolithic Podcast

Spacious and spectacular Monolithic Dome churches provide near absolute protection from fire, tornadoes, hurricanes and earthquakes.

Commercial Monolithic Dome Structures

Monolithic Domes are flexible. They can fill any structural need. So in addition to being designed as homes, schools, churches, sports facilities and bulk storages, they can be factories, prisons or jails, fire stations, administrative or business offices, etc.

Monolithic Domes are the greenest structures currently available. They have the added advantage of a super-strong outer shell and a clear-span interior. Those qualities make the domes a natural choice for virtually any type of building.

Monolithic’s Io-24

Although it’s small, the Io-24 is a Monolithic Dome that provides disaster-resistant and fire-resistant security. It’s energy-efficient and easy to maintain.

Podcast: Studios

Monolithic Podcasts

Monolithic Studios have the strength and durability of steel-reinforced concrete, insulated with polyurethane foam and blanketed with an Airform. It’s energy-efficient, easily maintained, disaster resistant, fire- and termite-proof.

More about the Monolithic Dome School

Emmett High School — Located in Idaho, Emmett High School was the first Monolithic Dome school build.  This five-dome facility has 900 students who use two 180-foot diameter domes that house classrooms and a gymnasium. The three smaller domes function as woodworking, metal and auto shops.

Monolithic Domes are proven survivors of tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, fires and bullets. They meet or exceed all regional building codes and requirements. They also meet or exceed FEMA’s specifications for a structure to provide near-absolute protection against tornadoes and hurricanes.

Introducing the Io-16.5

The Io-16.5 — It’s a Monolithic Dome with an oblate ellipse shape that has a diameter of just 16.5 feet, a height of 9 feet and a living area of 210 square feet.

Like its larger siblings, an Io-16.5 has the strength and durability of steel-reinforced concrete, insulated with polyurethane foam and blanketed with an Airform. It’s energy-efficient, easily maintained, disaster- and burglar-resistant, fire- and termite-proof.

Monolithic Ecoshells in Developing Nations

Check out this video describing the Monolithic Ecoshell and why it is the choice for housing in developing nations. They are strong structures that can withstand natural disasters, fire, termites and rot. In underdeveloped areas with hot climates, EcoShells make affordable, low maintenance, sturdy housing.

New sports dome completed in Taiwan

Dome entrance

Monolithic Domes are built around the world. This dome serves as a sports facility in Taiwan, as part of a larger sports complex. Located in the ‘Ring of Fire,’ this structure serves its purpose well.

The Io-24

The Io-24 — It’s built on a three-foot stemwall and has a diameter of twenty-four feet and a height of nine feet.

Although it’s small, the Io-24 is a Monolithic Dome that provides disaster-resistant and fire-resistant security. It’s energy-efficient and easy to maintain. Those qualities make the Io-24 a great rental for retired seniors or a single working person.

April 2007 – Monolithic Oil Tanks

Monolithic Constructors, a Texas-based builder of insulated, steel-reinforced concrete storage facilities, has introduced an oil storage tank that is fire-proof, hurricane-resistant and more affordable than traditional steel structures currently used for storing crude oil and refined products.

Is the Monolithic Dome code compliant?

Yes, Monolithic Dome buildings comply and exceed all of the usual building codes in every way. In many cases the Monolithic Dome can be placed immediately adjacent to other buildings because of its superior fire code conformance. This can be really important in commercial buildings, schools, and churches.

Could a dome survive an explosion?

Test dome

Monolithic Domes have been proven to withstand earthquakes, hurricanes, fires, and even gun shots. But what about an explosion? Thanks to a test by South Industries, we know the answer.

Monolithic Dome Benefits: Survivability

Whether it’s your home, your children’s school or some other structure that you and your loved ones spend time in, nothing beats knowing that you’re in a place that cannot be destroyed by most natural or manmade disasters. That’s the confidence Monolithic Domes offer. They meet or exceed FEMA’s standards for providing near-absolute protection. Monolithic Domes are proven survivors of tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes and fires.

Texas wildfires heighten interest in Monolithic Domes

The wildfires raging across Texas have heightened interest in fire-resistant Monolithic Domes, as home owners look for greater protection against all types of natural disasters. The general public will have the opportunity to learn more about these unusual homes when the Monolithic Dome Institute opens many of the dome homes on its property for public tours from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, October 15 as part of the 11th annual Fall Dome Tour.

Monolithic Dome Survives Texas Wildfire

June 2011: Texas wildfire destroyed 100,000 acres before it was stopped.

Fathers Day, 2011: On that day the Antelope Springs Ranch in Blackwell, Texas fell victim to a wildfire that blazed across the Lone Star State. This fire destroyed 100,000 acres before it was stopped.

Pensacola Paper Puts Spotlight on New Dome Home

The Simmons’ new dome home in Jay, Florida is making news again. This time it is the subject of a feature story in the Pensacola News Journal. Charlie Simmons, an engineer, told the newspaper that he wanted to build a dome home because of its many advantages including its resistance to hurricanes and fire. “Engineers like that,” Charlie told the newspaper. “Function over form.”

The Ideal Data Center: A Monolithic Dome

Shelters  — Shown here are two Tornado/Hurricane Shelters.  These are for storing bank buildings and emergency response equipment.  They could as well be housing data centers.

Companies need secure buildings – especially if they host computer systems and store data. Monolithic Domes make secure, solid, permanent facilities that can withstand tornadoes, earthquakes, wild temperature fluctuations and even rifle fire.

KMOV of St. Louis news article features Valley R-6 School District’s domes

A recent news article at KMOV-St. Louis features a video interview with Valley R-6 officials in Caledonia, Missouri. Quoting, ‘At first glance the five domes that make up Valley R-6 Elementary School in Caledonia, Missouri look odd, but school officials say they are the safest buildings in the face of a tornado. “They are tornado proof – hurricane proof – fire proof and so our kids are very safe,“ says Valley superintendent Brad Crocker.’

Monolithic Domes: Surviving Bullets, Projectiles, Tornadoes

The rifle used in this test was a Ruger 10/22, using a very standard 40 grain projectile. Damage from this rifle was minimal.

As they say on TV, “Don’t try this at home.” Don’t shoot holes in your home with a 30-06 caliber rifle. To test the bullet-resisting strength of a Monolithic Dome, Gary Clark, our VP of Sales, fired at our Monolithic Dome storage buildings.

More About Monolithic Domes

Bruco — Bruco – the Italian name for caterpillar – is the Airform manufacturing plant of Monolithic Constructors, Inc. It was built using a single Airform that was shaped as seven interconnected domes.

Monolithic Domes have obvious qualities that become apparent to most people as soon as they learn about the materials and technology used in the dome’s construction. We invite you to review them all.

Monolithic Ecoshells

Monolithic EcoShell in Indonesia — Domes For The World trained native workers to build Monolithic EcoShell Domes which provide clean, low-energy use, fire- and disaster-resistant homes and public buildings in New Ngelepen, Indonesia.

Besides Monolithic Domes, we have developed the technology to build two types of EcoShells. In the construction of an EcoShell I, concrete is layered onto the exterior of an inflated Airform. For EcoShell II, concrete is layered onto the interior of an inflated Airform. Either type usually is not insulated, but either is about the best, thin shell concrete structure currently available.

A fireplace in the Monolithic Dome

Chuck Peters made his fireplace the centerpiece of his living room.

I’m often asked if there’s a trick to installing fireplaces in a Monolithic Dome. It’s actually pretty straightforward. The real question is, “Do you need the fireplace?” I see the romantic appeal of visiting around a glowing fire or the desire to reduce your heating bill. However, the energy efficiency of the dome typically changes a need for a fireplace into a want.

Price, Utah: A Review of Its 20-Year-Old Monolithic Dome Complex

Public Works Complex — The Public Works Department of Price, Utah operates in a complex of Monolithic Domes built in 1982 and beautifully landscaped.

A uniqueness in Price, Utah is its four, interconnected Monolithic Domes, serving as its Public Works Complex since 1982. It consists of a three-story dome, 90′×40′, with administrative offices and three additional domes, each measuring 130′×43′, that house a Fire Station, a vehicle and equipment maintenance shop and a storage facility.

Monolithic Dome Schools

Bishop Nevins Academy — Bishop Nevins Academy in Sarasota, Florida is the first Monolithic Dome School in the state of Florida.

What does a community need and want in a school structure? We think the number one answer to that question is Safety. A Monolithic Dome makes a school that can’t be beat for safety. It not only meets but exceeds FEMA’s requirements for a structure that provides near-absolute protection.

The Monolithic Dome

Cutaway — Schematic cutaway of the layers of the final Monolithic Dome.

Monolithic Domes are constructed following a method that requires a tough, inflatable Airform, steel-reinforced concrete and a polyurethane foam insulation. Each of these ingredients is used in a technologically specific way.

Will Lightning Affect a Dome?

According to the experts, when lightning strikes a Monolithic Dome the electricty will travel to the rebar and dissipate into the footing. Lightning rods are used in conventional homes to prevent the lightning from traveling through the highly resistive wood of the home and starting a fire. They are unnecessary in a Monolithic Dome. The structure is already grounded.

Monolithic Dome Fact Sheet

Monolithic Dome is a round, steel-reinforced concrete building known for its energy efficiency, low maintenance, and ability to offer near absolute protection from natural disasters. While they have had a relatively low profile in the past, these unique buildings have slowly started gaining national prominence as school districts, churches, sports facilities and even home owners have opted for Monolithic Dome construction. Monolithic Dome homes have been featured on Good Morning America, The Today Show, the NBC Nightly News, MSNBC, CNBC, National Geographic Channel and Discovery Channel.

Tips for building in remote locations

Dome home built in a remote location near Alpine, Texas

When building in remote locations, there can be some extra requirements that need to be considered. In this article, David B. South, gives some of his top tips for building in these out-of-the-way places. Fire safety, planning, construction, generators and contract workers are some of the topics he addresses in this helpful article.

Timelapse shows construction of ammonium nitrate storage dome

Dome Airform

A new 29-foot-tall Monolithic Dome has been erected in Whitewright, Texas to provide storage for ammonium nitrate. The dome is located at the EDC Ag Products Company LLC (EDC Ag) facility and will give storage for 1,000 tons of the chemical. The construction of the 58-foot diameter dome was a cooperative effort among the community and EDC Ag.

Monolithic Dome: An Ideal, Automated Warehouse

Cut-away — Monolithic Dome cut-away showing the storage of pallets utilizing an automated storage and retrieval system furnished by PAS. www.pas-us.com

“The higher you go, the more susceptible a building is to hurricane or tornado damage,” said David South, president of Monolithic, at a discussion of the latest in warehouses, distribution centers and storage facilities. “That’s why the Monolithic Dome makes an ideal automated warehouse,” he added.

Monolithic Dome Suffers Slight Scorching In Oklahoma Wildfire

Dome in Marlow, OK survived a 3000 acre wildfire.

For 16 months, the construction of Jerri and Darrell Strube’s new Monolithic Dome home, 50 feet in diameter and 23 feet high, in Marlow, Oklahoma went relatively smoothly. Once Andy Barnes, owner of Alpha Omega Builders in Kingston, Oklahoma, completed the dome shell, Jerri and Darrell began doing the finishing. And all continued going rather well – until January 12.