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Emmett High School: First Monolithic Dome School Ten Years Later

Image: Emmett High School — Located in Emmett, Idaho, this five-dome facility was the first Monolithic Dome school built.

Emmett High School — Located in Emmett, Idaho, this five-dome facility was the first Monolithic Dome school built.

Image: Five Monolithic Domes — Emmett’s 900 students use two 180-foot diameter domes that house classrooms and a gymnasium. The three smaller domes function as woodworking, metal and auto shops.

Five Monolithic Domes — Emmett’s 900 students use two 180-foot diameter domes that house classrooms and a gymnasium. The three smaller domes function as woodworking, metal and auto shops.

Image: Commons Area and Atrium — Three floors of classrooms surround a five-story tall atrium. A 25’ diameter artificial skylight creates a daylight atmosphere during all weather conditions.

Commons Area and Atrium — Three floors of classrooms surround a five-story tall atrium. A 25’ diameter artificial skylight creates a daylight atmosphere during all weather conditions.

Image: Receiving Area and Corridor — They provide easy access to classrooms and offices.

Receiving Area and Corridor — They provide easy access to classrooms and offices.

Image: Theater — In 1988, the first class of Emmett High seniors held their graduation ceremony in a Monolithic Dome. Their diplomas are imprinted with the likeness of a dome.

Theater — In 1988, the first class of Emmett High seniors held their graduation ceremony in a Monolithic Dome. Their diplomas are imprinted with the likeness of a dome.

Image: Gymnasium — This double-wide gym can seat 3,000 for graduation ceremonies. It also has a weight room, wrestling room, locker rooms, offices, concessions and a 350 seat theater.

Gymnasium — This double-wide gym can seat 3,000 for graduation ceremonies. It also has a weight room, wrestling room, locker rooms, offices, concessions and a 350 seat theater.

Image: Energy-efficient Domes — In 1997, Superintendent Ron Noble reported that the Monolithic Domes save at least 66 percent in energy costs, over the district’s other conventional schools.

Energy-efficient Domes — In 1997, Superintendent Ron Noble reported that the Monolithic Domes save at least 66 percent in energy costs, over the district’s other conventional schools.

Image: Aerial View — School officials chose Monolithic Domes because they offered a reasonably priced, authentically unique alternative to so-called stick-frame buildings.

Aerial View — School officials chose Monolithic Domes because they offered a reasonably priced, authentically unique alternative to so-called stick-frame buildings.