This is the dome in Avalon, Texas that we used for our test.  The anemometer was placed at the apex of the dome, on a new post.

This is the dome in Avalon, Texas that we used for our test. The anemometer was placed at the apex of the dome, on a new post. (Mike South)


Monolithic Dome wind test yields exciting results

The Monolithic Dome Institute (MDI) teamed up with Engineer Morris Boughton to study wind speed over the top of a Monolithic Dome. During a series of tests in Avalon, Texas, the hypothesis that the wind speed increases over the top of the dome was proven.

Mr. Boughton has over 25 years of hands-on design engineering experience in signal conditioning, instrumentation, and microwave communication and control systems for aerospace industries and major commercial television networks.

One of the patents Mr. Boughton holds is for a wind turbine enhancement apparatus. It is a method and system which allows the “wind to blow harder,” thereby allowing for higher levels of energy production for dome habitats.

Already familiar with the fact that wind speeds increase over the tops of hills due to atmospheric pressure, David B. South of the Monolithic Dome Institute and Mr. Boughton predicted the increase in wind speed over the top of the Monolithic Dome. They designed an experiment using a Monolithic Dome in a clear area to show the increased wind speed measured over hills also applied to Monolithic Domes.

In MDI’s and Mr. Boughton’s wind experiment, a wind meter was installed on the top of a Monolithic Dome about six feet higher than the dome itself. As a control, an independent pole was then set up about 150 feet away from the dome, in a direction so that the path of the wind was not also in the path of the dome. This gave them the ability to measure the difference between normal wind speed and the wind speed as it traveled over the top of the Monolithic Dome.

The experiment was not only a success, but the initial results are very promising! Mr. Boughton’s preliminary report showed a significant increase in wind speed over the top of the Monolithic Dome. He is working on a final report now and all are very excited to see the official results.

One of the exciting uses for the results is in the windmill industry. If a Monolithic Dome is built underneath an existing windmill, the dome should provide a significant increase in wind speed at the tip of the windmill blades—where the windmill needs wind speed the most. This is just one example of the way a Monolithic Dome can be used to harness wind power. MDI is excited to see how this technology improves.

Our man lift was used to create the second measuring point.  On the basket we tied the second anemometer.

Our man lift was used to create the second measuring point. On the basket we tied the second anemometer. (Mike South)

This picture shows both measuring points.

This picture shows both measuring points. (Mike South)

Data Logger that we used to log the measurements was kept in a van that protected it, and provided the power.

Data Logger that we used to log the measurements was kept in a van that protected it, and provided the power. (Mike South)

Morris Boughton (on the left) explains to us the preliminary readings and how good they are.

Morris Boughton (on the left) explains to us the preliminary readings and how good they are. (Mike South)

David South, President of the Monolithic Dome Institute, is here observing the tests as they progress.

David South, President of the Monolithic Dome Institute, is here observing the tests as they progress. (Mike South)