Featured Monolithic Dome Sport Facilities

Monolithic Dome sport facilities, ranging in size from school gymnasiums to super arenas, often are designed and constructed for more than one use. Many double as disaster shelters. Others include stage and auditorium accommodations. This link will lead you to their stories.


Park University Sports Center: Monolithic Domes for an Underground College

Park U at night — Exterior lighting enhances the beauty of the twin Monolithic Domes.

“Park University is a modern-day pioneer, exploring, expanding and extending its programs,” said Dr. Donald Breckon, president of this 120-year-old, unique college in Parkville, Missouri. Built among bluffs and wooded hills, Park University overlooks the Missouri River. That, in itself, is not unusual. But buildings constructed largely of limestone mined from below the campus is, and that’s just what Park College has at its home campus.

Beggs, Oklahoma Builds Two Monolithic Domes

Beggs, OK Event Center — Beggs built two Monolithic Domes: A 160’ diameter gymnasium/event center built on a 24’ Orion wall; a 112’ diameter dome on a 12’ Orion wall that provides nine additional classrooms, offices and a student commons area.

After receiving a Monolithic Dome School packet via snail mail, Marsha Norman, Superintendent of Beggs ISD in Beggs, Oklahoma gathered a few school board members and Architect Michael McCoy and headed to Italy, Texas to discuss building options with David South and tour nearby Monolithic Dome gymnasiums and homes.

A Super Gymnasium: Gladiator Coliseum

Gladiator Coliseum at Italy, Texas High School — This Monolithic Dome  has a diameter of 148 feet, two stories with seating for 1500, a gym with a walking track, an auditorium, classrooms for special activities, concession stands, ticket booths, locker rooms and bathrooms, and concrete parking areas. Its 2002 construction cost: $85 per square foot.

Once the 2000 residents of Italy, Texas, where Monolithic is headquartered, passed a $2 million bond for a Multipurpose Center, administrators began researching popular construction of school facilities. Superintendent Mike Clifton said, “Of course we were all familiar with the domes. We had a good overview. But we really had to see for ourselves, so we visited Thousand Oaks — a dome already operating — and we came away convinced.”

A Monolithic Dome Gym at Thousand Oaks

Thousand Oaks Ranch — It’s a Monolithic Dome retreat center with a semi-elliptical shape, a 143-foot diameter and a 45-foot height in Barry, Texas.

A Monolithic Dome that is semi-elliptical in shape, 143’ in diameter and 45’ in height will greet youths arriving for summer camp and adults attending retreats at the Thousand Oaks Retreat Center near Barry, Texas this summer. Established in 1995 by the DFW Church of Christ Jesus in Carrollton, Texas.

Payson Athletic Center

Payson Athletic Center — This Monolithic Dome was designed as a Multipurpose Educational Facility for Payson High School in Payson, Arizona.

Coaches, athletes and sports fans are delighted with Payson Unified School District’s new multipurpose dome, which will be home to the district’s middle and high school basketball, volleyball and wrestling teams.

New Monolithic Dome Multipurpose Center at Avalon

Avalon, Texas Multipurpose Center  — This Monolithic Dome gymnasium and center has a diameter of 124 feet and a height of 37 feet that includes a 12-foot-high stemwall.

While the population count of Avalon, Texas may be in doubt and small, its pride and interest in their school is not. Most recent proof of that is Avalon’s new Multipurpose Center, for its 250 students in pre-kindergarten to Grade 12. Designed by Monolithic Architect Rick Crandall and built with a 12’ stemwall, this Monolithic Dome measures 124′ × 25′ with a total height of 37 feet.

Trinidad School District Gymnasium and Field House

This super energy efficient Monolithic Dome Gymnasium is now a tornado shelter as well.  The power savings will equal the cost of the building in less than 20 years.  The lifetime is expected to be centuries.

Trinidad, a Texas rural community of 1100 and school district with about 300 students, has been using its Monolithic Dome gymnasium and field house for about seven years now, since their completion in October 2004.